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Girls Can Fly lands back at Region of Waterloo Airport

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An annual event aimed at encouraging girls and women to get involved in aviation landed back at the Region of Waterloo International Airport.

Hundreds were out at the Waterloo Wellington Flight Centre Saturday for the ninth annual Girls Can Fly event.

"It's for ages eight to 18 and the goal is to get them interested and see if they want to become a pilot," said Julie Mudry of the flight centre. "Let them know it's something they can do."

Several airlines were present, airplanes were on display, and flight simulators were available for girls and young women to check out.

"I was surprised by the amount of universities that are offering aviation programs," said grade 10 student Abigail Macdonald. "I'm at the stage in my high school career when I'm looking at universities, so it's cool to see that they offer things like that."

Both Abigail and her younger sister Lilliana found themselves at the flight simulator, but hope to one day be flying real planes.

"I think it's great that there's an event like this for women, because it's so empowering," said Abigail. "It's so great to meet all these different women that are all interested in this and to have this opportunity."

Mudry says part of the goal for the event is to also bump up the number of female pilots.

"Right now, about six per cent of pilots in Canada are females," said Mudry. "We're trying to raise that number, and I think we're succeeding slowly, but we still have a long way to go."

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