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Federal government provides more funding for Guelph based community-led projects

(Terry Kelly/CTV Kitchener) (Terry Kelly/CTV Kitchener)
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The Government of Canada is spending an additional $1.8 million in three community-led projects in Guelph.

On Tuesday, the federal government said the money will be provided through Health Canada’s Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP.)

“With this funding, these projects will help improve health outcomes for people who are at risk of experiencing substance-related harms and overdose by scaling up prevention, harm reduction and treatment efforts,” the news release reads.

“With this funding, these projects will help improve health outcomes for people who are at risk of experiencing substance-related harms and overdose by scaling up prevention, harm reduction and treatment efforts,” the news release reads.

The money is provided through Health Canada’s Substance Use and Addictions Program (SUAP).

The money is being distributed to the following organizations:

Wyndham House will receive $248,032 in addition to $999,171 already provided by SUAP. The funds are to implement and expand the Concurrent Specialized Youth Hub, which provides access to multiple supports in the City of Guelph and in Wellington and Dufferin Counties.

Stonehenge Therapeutic Community Inc. will get $48,801 added to the existing $207,403 already provided by SUA to implement the Peer 2 Peer Overdose Response Program, which will provide a peer-led, low barrier urgent response to those who have experienced substance use harms in Guelph and Wellington County.

Meanwhile, Guelph Community Health Centre will receive $1,532,071 in addition to the existing $2,442,802 already provided by SUAP to continue to provide a pharmaceutical alternative to help mitigate harms from the toxic illegal drug supply and help prevent overdoses.

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