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WRDSB joins forces with KidsAbility for superpower celebration

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Students with Waterloo Regional District School Board (WRDSB) put their best superpowers on display to raise funds for KidsAbility, while learning lessons along the way.

Kids, teachers and community members had capes on and spirits flying on Friday.

“We can raise awareness for people who need extra help with their disabilities,” said 12-year-old Preston.

Students were able to raise $20,000 for the cause.

For the first time, KidsAbility collaborated with the WRDSB to highlight and uplift everyone’s unique abilities.

Jennifer Foster, CEO of KidsAbility, believes it has been an amazing partnership.

“These children show the power of inclusion, the power of wanting to make sure their supporting their friends to achieve their pull potential,” said Foster.

The school board’s chairperson, Joanne Weston, said it’s a day of celebration.

“We are here to celebrate every child and youth’s superpowers here and raise awareness about kids ability and the great work they do,” said Weston.

Sorting out what superpowers they would want was top of mind for many of the young participants.

“If I could have a superpower it would probably be shapeshifting because then you could basically have every superpower,” Lyla, 11, said.

Others suggested teleportation or being kind to others as possible superpowers.

It was not all high stakes superhero talk. The thousands of dollars raised will help thousands of kids.

“KidsAbility supports over 4000 children here across 121 schools that have 65,000 students in Waterloo Region. In addition, we’re supporting them with their behavioral, their physical and their developmental needs,” said Foster.

This was the first hear for the partnership and fundraiser but officials are hoping to keep the momentum going by making this an annual event.

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