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Neuron e-scooters back on the streets in Waterloo Region

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Orange e-scooters are popping up across Waterloo Region once again.

The Neuron devices returned to dozens of spots across Kitchener, Waterloo, and Cambridge on Saturday.

This marks the second year for the e-scooters and e-bikes following their launch in April 2023.

Neuron says its riders have travelled nearly 400,000 kilometers since then.

“Last year was a tremendous success,” said Isaac Ransom, head of corporate affairs for Neuron. “We expect to see people out and about again this year across the three cities in the region.”

The Region of Waterloo says survey results from last year’s trial showed 37 per cent of people using the e-scooters were getting to and from transit stops.

Kevan Marshall with the Region of Waterloo says working with the cities to improve connections with transit will be a major priority this year.

“Our main objective is to make sustainable transportation the easiest choice for more and more residents in Waterloo Region,” Marshall said.

Neuron estimates the e-bikes and e-scooters have had a $8.2 million impact on the local economy based on a survey of users.

The company is hoping that number will grow this year as it has worked with municipalities to create more parking stations.

“The idea is to provide as much parking as possible, as close to as many amenities and businesses as possible, but do not impede the middle of the sidewalk,” Ransom said.

The devices can be accessed and paid for via the Neuron app.

E-scooters and e-bikes cannot be ridden on sidewalks and all users must wear helmets. It’s also illegal to ride while impaired.

Neuron in Waterloo Region in 2023 by the numbers:

  • Riders travelled 385,000 km between April (launch) and October (when e-bikes and scooters were stored for the winter)
  • The average trip was 2.1 km and took 14 minutes

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